Gulf Coast Dries Out After Hurricane Isaac

Vessel owners across the Southeast sought refuge in hurricane holes during Isaac. Photo by Lisa Overing
Vessel owners across the Southeast sought refuge in hurricane holes during Hurricane Isaac. Photo by Lisa Overing

Weeks after slow-moving Hurricane Isaac relentlessly dumped water across the Gulf Coast, cleanup efforts continued, especially in New Orleans where many neighborhoods lost electricity for four days.

Everyone in New Orleans’ West End worked over Labor Day weekend, tearing out sheetrock and removing soft goods and appliances from soggy boathouses.

Ed Boos rode out Isaac at his boathouse onboard his 49-foot Neptunus, enjoying the benefits of generator power. His fishing and hunting camp in Myrtle Grove, La., was also hard hit. His fishing boat was blown out of dry storage, landing almost a mile away.

Boos, who bought his boathouse on Lake Pontchartrain in 2006, experiences water damage after any exceptionally hard rain. He’s used to the cleanup, but Isaac was a bit worse to recover from than anticipated. “We’ve got work to do here,” he said. “The water from Isaac was higher than Gustav or Lee.”

Hurricane Isaac crept very slowly over South Louisiana. Wind-driven water seeped through hurricane windows at Southern Yacht Club, causing interior damage to elevators, carpet and walls, forcing a temporary closure for repairs. Club races re-convened immediately following Isaac and the crane and dry storage quickly resumed normal operation.

The good news is that all the structures that were rebuilt after Katrina – the boathouses, the yacht club and the new lighthouse – stood up to Isaac.

 

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